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Total Reconstruction of the Temporomandibular Joint with a Stock Prosthesis

  • Eric J. Granquist
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author.
    Affiliations
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, 5th floor White Building, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
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  • Peter D. Quinn
    Affiliations
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, 5th floor White Building, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

    Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Suite 5A, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
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      Indications for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reconstruction include bony ankylosis, failed previous alloplastic and autogenous joint replacement, posttraumatic condylar injury, avascular necrosis, posttumor reconstruction, developmental abnormalities, functional deformity, and severe inflammatory conditions that have failed to resolve with conservative treatments. Successful TMJ replacement requires careful preoperative planning, reasonable patient expectations, proper intraoperative technique, regimented postoperative physical therapy, close follow-up, and adequate pain management. Achieving successful TMJ replacement often requires multidisciplinary care from oral and maxillofacial surgeons, pain specialists, internists, physical therapists, and general dentists to optimize patient outcome.
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      Further Readings

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